bc Latest News & Events

  • June 30, 2016
    Young Talk – Cheung Ying Seminar

    Cheung Ying Seminar

     

    Date: Jun 30 ( Thu)
    Time: 7:30 – 10:00pm
    Venue: 1/F Broadway Cinematheque 
    Speaker: Shu Kei, Honkaz Fung, William Yuen

  • June 28, 2016
    Martin Scorsese’s Film Talk – Caught

    Caught

     

    1949 / black & white / 88mins / In English
    Director:  Max Ophuls
    Cast:  James Mason, Robert Ryan, Barbara Bel Geddes

     

    Like all melancholics, Ophuls preferred the butt end of imperial power to the full flare; when he moved to the United States, to a new empire at once more ambitious and more enlightened than the Austro-Hungarian, he retained his taste for the glittering shadows, and for a climate of enervated hope. Caught, his 1949 tale of a dreamy girl (Barbara Bel Geddes) who marries a monster (Robert Ryan, in a barely concealed portrait of Howard Hughes), only to run away and catch the eye of a harassed doctor (James Mason).  Caught is now considered masterwork, unprecedented compacting of amour fou and film noir. In retrospect, such a combination of radical insight and Old World elegance was probably just too much for Ophuls’s hosts. As the doctor in Caught says, admonishing the millionaire’s wife who works secretly in his surgery, “You’re so fancy you’re scaring people away.”

     

    Date: May 31 (Tue)
    Time: 7:00 – 10:00pm
    Venue: 1/F Broadway Cinematheque
    Speaker: Au Ho Chung

  • May 31, 2016
    Martin Scorsese’s Film School Talk – A Matter of Life and Death

    A Matter of Life and Death

     

    1946 / Color / 104mins / In English with English subtitles
    Director:  Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger
    Cast:  David Niven, Kim Hunter

     

    One of Powell’s and Pressburger’s most elegant achievements, and Powell’s own favourite from his time at the production company Archer’s, this is part romance, part surrealist courtroom drama. David Niven is Peter Carter, a RAF pilot (and poet) who bails out of his plane over the Channel. By a clerical error on the part of the angel (Marins Goring) due to escort him to heaven, Peter survives long enough to meet and fall in love with a young US woman (Kim Hunter), with whom he had been in radio contact in his fateful, fatal flight. As his life hangs in the balance, Peter appears before a celestial court to plea for another shot at life, with Raymond Massey, an Anglo-hating American revolutionary, prosecuting. With surface similarities to the same year’s It’s A Wonderful Life, the film is a richly realized fantasy that reverses the visual conceit of The Wizard Of Oz. Here, under the control of Jack Cardiff, a master of Technicolor, the real world is filmed in colour, the dream-world-in-the-sky in monochrome.

     

    Date: May 31 (Tue)
    Time: 7:00 – 10:00pm
    Venue: 1/F Broadway Cinematheque
    Speaker: Anna

bc Archive

  • ' Whatever Works '
    — Woody Allen

    In the first movie Allen has made in his native New York in five years, he teams up with another iconic New Yorker Larry David, who plays the misanthrope Boris Yellnikoff who encounters a young woman Melody and lets her into his life, even marrying her! Does the May-December romance ring a bell? But when is Allen never self-mocking? As Allen’s stand-in, Larry David never loses his own voice as the knobbly-kneed, plaid-shorts-wearing, know-it-all geezer who rather yells at than talk to people.

     

     

  • ' Diving Bell and Butterfly '
    — Julian Schnabel

    Jean-Dominique Bauby led a glamorous life as editor of the French Elle until the day he was hit by a massive stroke, which left him completely paralysed – except for his brain and one good eye. Starting with one blink for “yes” and two for “no”, Bauby gradually developed a communication system with the help of a speech therapist. Using his blinks, he spent over a year dictating his thoughts to an editor, and the result is the novel The Diving Bell and the Butterfly – the basis for Julian Schnabel’s life-affirming, award-winning (Best Director at Cannes) film.

     

     

  • ' Drifting Flowers '
    — Zero Chou

    Through three stories, director Zero Chou explores three kinds of love. The young Meigo lives with her blind sister the lounge singer Ging. While the androgynous accordionist Chalkie falls for Ging, Meigo’s young heart beats for Chalkie. Lily loves a certain woman, but she is married to Yen, who loves men. In their peculiar way, the two takes care of each other and form a strong bond. The last story concerns the young Chalkie and how she eventually understands her sexuality.

  • ' Baby Love '
    — Vincent Garenq

     Manu and Philippe face a dilemma that has challenged many other couples, gay or straight: one wants a baby, the other doesn’t. Since gay adoption is not an option in France, Manu convinces Fina, an illegal Argentinean to enter into a marriage of convenience with him. Fina will be a surrogate mother to Manu’s baby, and she gets her permit to live in France. The plan sounds fine, except that in life, things often do not turn out the way they’re planned. Featuring two marginalized social groups (gays and immigrants),Baby Love certainly is a romantic comedy with a twist.

     

  • ' Fleeing by Night '
    — Hsu Li Kong

    Fleeing By Night is a lush period piece that follows the love triangle of three men against the backdrop of the Chinese opera. American-educated cellist Shaodong, albeit engaged to Ying’er, is attracted to the Peking opera star Lin Chung. Things get complicated when the wealthy Zilei also sets his eyes on Lin Chung. Set primarily in the late 1930s, the film effectively uses China’s pre-revolution cultural contrasts to parallel its characters’ own identity crises.

     

     

  • ' Swallowtail Butterfly '
    — Shunji Iwai

    This is the story of Yentown, a Tokyo ghetto inhabited by immigrants from all over Asia. The story revolves around a group of poverty-stricken immigrants, to whom a sudden twist of fate gives the opportunity to literally make money and thus realize their dreams. Shot with handheld camera, tinted with laughter, violence, sadness and imagination, Swallowtail Butterfly is impossible to be pinned down to a single genre. Juxtaposing the music of Frank Sinatra and Yentown Band is only of the many eccentricities found in the film.

     

  • ' Barbarian Invasion '
    — Denys Arcand

     A sequel to Denys Arcand’s relationships comedy, The Decline Of The American Empire, Barbarian Invasion tells the story of a Montreal history professor Remy whose body has been invaded by a fatal illness, and of the weeks and days leading up to his death. At centre stage is Remy’s relationship with Sebastien, his estranged son and his temperamental opposite. This is a film that sheds the spotlight on its characters than its plot; the deftly created, charismatic characters easily lead you into a world where universal themes of sex, ageing, family and faith are explored seriously and wittily.

  • ' Transamerica '
    — Duncan Tucker

    In about a week’s time, pre-operative transsexual Bree will undergo the final operation that will complete her transition from a man to a woman. Just at this critical time, she learns that she has a son named Toby, and he is in trouble. Going all the way to New York, Bree bails Toby and the two of them set off on a trip back to Los Angeles, without Toby realising that Bree is his biological father. As Bree, Felicity Huffman’s awkward mix of male/female mannerisms is so on-target. Her edgy, raw, and carefully contained performance made her winner of the Golden Globe Best Actress award.

     

     

  • ' Tsotsi '
    — Gavin Hood

    Gavin Hood has taken a 1960 novel and re-shaped it for a 2005 post-Apartheid South Africa, where racial divides have largely been replaced by schisms of class. Tsotsi is the ruthless leader of a nasty gang of four in Soweto, the township outside Johannesburg. During a carjacking, he discovers a baby in the backseat. His attempts at caring for the baby reveal another side of Tsotsi, despite his continuing gangster acts. Tsotsi is not a story of total redemption, but it is not complete despair either. Newcomer Presley Chweneyagaegives an impressive performance.

     

     

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